Bruny Island

I’ve visited Tasmania many times and usually base my travels in Hobart, however I had never journeyed out to Bruny Island before. Situated only a half hour south of Hobart (plus an additional half hour for the ferry crossing though) Bruny Island is a serene little gem. Known for its spectacular local produce, untouched shorelines, walking tracks and 360 degree views, the island really is worth visiting.

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Arriving on the ferry, Bruny Island, Tasmania, AUSTRALIA

Wanting to make the most of our day, we caught one of the earlier ferries. From Hobart you simply drive to Kettering and follow the signs to the terminal. The ferries run around every half hour and there’s no need to book in advance. Just double check when the last ferry leaves so you don’t get stuck on the island (although there are far worse places to be stranded)

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The Neck, Bruny Island, Tasmania, AUSTRALIA

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The Neck Lookout, Bruny Island, Tasmania, AUSTRALIA

Our first stop was the Neck, a stretch of land separating North Bruny from South Bruny. From the top of the Neck lookout there were 360˚ views of the two islands, the isthmus and the ocean on either side. There’s an optical illusion there that makes the water on one side higher than the other. If you go at the right time of day you can also catch the penguins returning to the beach just below the lookout.

 

Next on the list was to do a little bush-walking and soak up some more of the shoreline. There are dozens of  walking tracks on the island to choose from. We chose Grassy Point because it boasted excellent views of Penguin Island, was easily accessible by road and was only a 90 minutes return walk. You reach Grassy Point Track from the end of Adventure Bay Road. From there it’s an easy walk, mostly flat, to Penguin Island. It was an entirely coastal walk which suited us perfectly and was abundant with wildlife. We spotted several wallabies on the walk. Just watch out for snakes, particularly if it’s sunny.

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Courts Bay, Bruny Island, Tasmania, AUSTRALIA

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Bruny Island Lighthouse, Bruny Island, Tasmania, AUSTRALIA

Bruny Island Lighthouse is located at the very south of the south island. It was a decent drive to get there but it was a pleasant one. We past a lot of farms and there was plenty of opportunity for a bite to eat or a cellar door visit along the way. The lighthouse is on a particularly beautiful part of the island; the cliffs are wild, untamed and entirely untouched.

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Get Shucked, Bruny Island, Tasmania, AUSTRALIA

 

We’d been having so much fun exploring the island we had forgotten to have lunch! So it was about 3 o’clock in the afternoon when we drove ourselves back to the north island to enjoy some local delicacies. Our late lunch was at Get Shucked where we tried a few different kinds of oysters including their deep-fried ones which were incredibly good. We had just stepped foot inside the cafe when it began to hail all of a sudden. It had been a lovely sunny morning but the weather changed incredibly fast. All I can suggest is to pack clothes for all four seasons. This isn’t too much trouble for me, as a Melburnian I’m pretty used to unpredictable weather. When the hail and rain eased off we dashed down the road to Bruny Island Cheese Co. where we enjoyed some wine and a cheese platter.

It was a perfect day on Bruny Island but honestly we barely scratched the surface of everything there is to do there. I will definitely be back soon and next time I’ll probably spend a night or two there and I’ll try some of the island’s famous whiskey too.

 

 

 

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